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Link to Article on 3 Exercises anyone can Use to gain control of their lats (back muscles) posted Sep 19, 2017

The link below will take you to an article I wrote for elite baseball performance. These exercises can be adapted to various sports or for anyone looking for pain free performance.

LINK TO ARTICLE:

https://elitebaseballperformance.com/3-exercises-baseball-players-can-use-gain-control-lats/

QUICK PREVIEW WITH THE FIRST EXERCISE CLICK THE LINK FOR MORE INFO:

The latissimus dorsi muscle is important in baseball players.

The lats can be a baseball player’s best friend as well as their worst enemy at times. The lats are an expansive muscle group originating in the low back and ending up at the humerus and sometimes also attaching to the scapula.

When the lats are given free reign without control from opposing musculature, gross extension patterns in player’s lumbar spines may begin to show up.

This can then lead to players letting their coaches know of nagging arm and back pain.

With the three exercises below, players can regain control of certain opposition muscles such as the serratus anterior, the internal oblique and the transversus abdominis to help restore balance.

Bear Position Step Up

The combination of bear position hold and a “step up” can be a great integrative exercise for abdominal control as well as shoulder stability and mobility.

Players need their serratus anterior properly engaged to maintain their ability to repeatedly throw gas over an entire game. This exercise helps players find their abs and serratus while gaining control over their lats. This can then allow them to demonstrate scapular control in a slightly challenging position.

This exercise can be coupled with the next two exercises to help ingrain this new position.

Cues I use: 

  • Reach your arms as long as you can throughout the whole movement.
  • Keep your belt buckle towards your chin
  • Breathe going in through your nose and out through your mouth while trying to fill the middle part of your back instead of your neck and upper chest. 


To learn more about pain free training or any questions related to training and nutrition reach out!

Thanks,


Erik Krueger

Erik Krueger is currently a first year Doctor of Physical Therapy Student at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. He has worked in physical preparation for the last 4 years and has an end goal of blending physical therapy with strength and conditioning to maximize the potential of all his patients and clients.

460 PointsSilver

Erik Krueger

/ Nutrition Strength Coach