close
Login
close
Create Your Account
close
Please enter your email
close
Alert
close
Alert
loading ChatOwl...
Loading
Find Answers
ChatOwl
menu

Recent questions in Health

Helen Granskog

/ Certified Wellness Coach and Author
Here are some tips to help you push through and thrive mentally, physically and emotionally during the winter. 1. Embrace the cold 2. Brighten your day with color 3. Supplement with vitamin D 4. Make time to read and watch movies 5. Spend time with friends 6. Find a hobby 7. Start a project 8. Enjoy comfort foods 9. Consider light therapy 10. Enjoy a warm fire with friends

Rachel Pepin

/ Branding Advisor
Getting out and doing something even when you don't feel like it: Can be going for a walk, putting on your favorite tunes, grabbing a hot beverage, taking a class, slowing down, calling a friend.. often by helping out someone else.

Amy Sherman, LMHC

/ Therapist & Certified Relationship Coach / LMHC
Bad things happen to everyone and most of us will get depressed over it. But as time passes you start to feel better as you either accept the circumstances or change them. This is situational depression. If, on the other hand, your depression stays and you can't shake the sadness, exhaustion, lack of motivation or change in your overall behavior (sleeping, eating, playing), you may be suffering from chronic depression -- and medication may be necessary.

Dr. Debra LMFT (MT2416)

/ The Relationship Expert / LMFT
I'm not sure how you would get over that fear, as fears are usually unfounded. The only way to get over most fears is to face them. Hmmm, so facing death might mean talking to someone who is near death, lots of them, because everyone does not face death the same way. Some are just as afraid as you are and some seem to welcome death. You my even consider going to a hospice facility and talking to the caregivers, asking them how they deal with all the death they encounter on the daily. Finally, read the book "Tuesdays with Morrie," by Mitch Albom. It's about a man slowing dying. Tell me what you learn? While I'm talking about death, I'm also talking about fear and anxiety in general. Death is just one of many things we stress, needlessly, about.

Dr. Debra LMFT (MT2416)

/ The Relationship Expert / LMFT
I was just wondering this last week. As my father is one of those persons. By some definitions, he would have been considered a working or functional alcoholic. But over time, and a few loses, he stopped drinking all the time and getting drunk. Don't ask me how he did it. But my off-the-cuff is that he had a knowing that it was good for him. He admits now that he didn't really like the taste of liquor, it was just a habit. So, from my standpoint, he simply weened himself. Same thing with smoking, he doesn't smoke any more.

Amy Kalama Hochreiter MSW

/ Elder Care & Whole Person Health Coach
Finances are always a concern when an adult parent is no longer able to care for him/herself or when an elderly spouse is also unable to provide that care. Many adult children pause their work life and sometimes, family life to provide this care. In many states, Medicaid (or a variant) provides a benefit for the senior and adult child. In Arizona, AHCCCS has ALTCS (Arizona Long Term Care System) to pay a caregiver son or daughter to care for the elder. Restrictions include income, which is adjusted every year, little to no savings and a medical need for full benefit care. When approved, this care can be provided in the senior’s own home, by his or her own family. Medicaid is a federal program and many states have their own requirements for participation in addition to the above. A couple is allowed to have more income and savings, especially if only one senior needs the care. In addition, the VA offers a Veterans Aid and Attendance Pension, which will assist seniors who have nearly exhausted their resources but who also need comprehensive care. This program requires the vet history include a period of war whether or not the vet actually saw active duty. Widows are eligible as well as married couples. Of course, planning ahead provides the best solution. Saving enough, purchasing long-term care insurance or some other form of financial protections to provide for your self and loved ones will go a long way when this time of life is reached. Each community has a Council on Aging, which can provide excellent assistance, information, and education for the geriatric parent and family seeking options for care. Be sure to utilize this resource. Some communities offer respite care through this agency or assistance in the home for bathing and housekeeping for those with very limited incomes. There are many resources, free and otherwise that offer information to aging adults and their caregivers, which includes caregiver support groups, financial assistance, transportation, life alert, and a newer technology that offers medication management, video oversight, among others. Plan now for a safer future for yourself and your loved family.

Helen Granskog

/ Certified Wellness Coach and Author
During Valentines we often think of and talk about the special love between two people but I would encourage us to take some time to celebrate the love we should have for ourselves, first. Only when we love ourselves first and make sure our needs are met, can we successfully and adequately meet the needs of those around us. We can only give what we have from a full cup. The best gift you can give this year is prioritizing and taking time for your self-care. Self-care is essential in order to live a balanced life full of love. When our own needs are not met in the midst of a busy schedule, we get burned out and are no longer effective at meeting the needs of those we love. Make time to figure out what would bring you peace, maybe it is a massage regularly, a night out with the girls, time to just sit and read, painting, journaling, taking a nap, taking an interesting class, meditation or engaging in some exercise.

LaTasha Russell, Psy.D.

/ Relationships Expert
To cope with a heartbreak, there are adaptive and maladaptive ways. Here are a few adaptive ways to cope: * meditate on the serenity prayer ("to accept the things one cannot change, the courage to change the things one can, and to have the wisdom to know the difference") * self-reflect on your role played in the breakup * eliminate negative self-talk * learn to accept someone who leaves your life * practice thinking of singlehood as something positive Here are the maladaptive ways: * drinking alcohol excessively * smoking frequently * isolate from those that care about you * avoid talking about the reason behind the breakup * do not become consumed by their absence (e.g driving by their homes to see if they have moved on, stalking their social media) * do not become promiscuous * do not become bitter believing you are not wanted

LaTasha Russell, Psy.D.

/ Relationships Expert
Most of the time someone that's in love thinks about the person all the time, smiles when talking about them, is overly excited to see them, wants that person to be the first and last person they speak to during the day and does not want them to leave. However, being in love makes someone blind to the truth and at times, make decisions they would not normally make if they were not in love. Some of these decisions can be detrimental and life-changing.
To see more, click for the full list of questions.